Missing a Film and Missing a Dog

b272c-16124110_1754114004904848_3202377720986075136_nI just now finished up posting all of my reviews for the movies we watched at Ebertfest this year.  It was a splendid group of films, as per usual.  Lots of things I hadn’t seen this time around, which is always fun.  I was shocked I hadn’t ever seen Hair or Being There, but I hadn’t. I loved the documentaries as well, particularly Mind/Game about Chamique Holdsclaw’s struggle with mental illness.  She was eloquent and brave and open.  I also really enjoyed Elle, disturbing and confounding as it was, and The Handmaiden.  The storytelling in The Handmaiden was smart and creative.  It was, as I said, a fantastic experience once again… except…

For a brief terrible time, day four, midafternoon, our little Riley went missing.  We were on a break from the festival, searching for a little chocolate to sate the sweet tooth, and in that vein had wandered into Cafe Kopi (our favorite coffee spot downtown).  We’d chosen a couple of small bars and also a little snack pack of some meats and cheeses when K got a text from our lawn guy.  He’d left the gate open, thinking the dogs couldn’t get out to the backyard, and Riley had run out.  We threw our goods back into the case at Kopi, literally, and ran toward the Jeep.  We didn’t even, right away anyway, tell Mom, who was inside the theater, or our friend Ann, also inside the theater, that we were leaving, we just left.  I drove too fast and sort of like a maniac to get home.  K’s daughter had been called by our lawn guy as well because he hadn’t been able to get ahold of K right way.  She was on her way to our house at the same time we were, though slightly ahead of us.  She hadn’t made it to our house yet when she spotted Riley running down a street fairly near our home.  She stopped her car in the middle of the road, jumped out, and called to Riley, sitting down on the side of the road to try and be calm for Riley.  Riley though, given her poor eyesight and the panic she was probably feeling at the time, ran the other direction.  Mary, K’s daughter, called K, who I dropped off, and K started chasing.  She also spotted Riley, on another street, way far way and up head.  She called to Riley, but at just that moment our gardener drove past K and we think Riley saw him (who she was afraid of) and continued to run.  K chased her on foot for a bit, not seeing her anymore, but circling around.  K eventually came back to the house and got on her bike so she could be faster and cover more ground.  Mary walked around as well, in other areas, and this whole time I drove around our neighborhood, all the places we walk (which are many).  We talked to everyone we passed, asking if people had seen her.  Some had and pointed us in one direction or another, others hadn’t.  It was terrifying and heart-breaking.  We cried a lot, though we were trying not to, trying to stay focused, trying to keep on track.  My Mom, who we’d contacted, left the theater and took an Uber to our house.  Once she got there she stood out front, with the garage door open, just in case Riley came back.

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Four hours this went on.  Four hours of looking and not finding her, of asking people, of circling and driving and riding and walking.  At one point we took Weston out thinking if Riley heard or saw him she would come to him, but he eventually got too tired and we had to take him home.  I walked and ran and yelled and asked and drove and asked and drove.  K walked and rode her bike and eventually got in Mary’s car with her and they drove around and around.  Mary walked and ran and drove.  My Mom paced in front of our house, showing anyone who walked past Riley’s photo and asked about her.  Weston fretted in the house knowing something was wrong, probably wondering where his little sister was.

We missed a film at the festival.  We didn’t care.

Finally, four hours later, I was driving along a street I’d been up and down many times, when a man, who I’d stopped and asked about Riley earlier, waved me down.  He said he’d just seen her running West.  I knew that was toward our house.  At the same time, I got a text, but I didn’t check it because I was then trying to get home to see if she was around there anywhere.  I pulled up toward our house and my Mom looked at me and gave the biggest smile, pantomiming that Riley was there, that she’d shown back up.

Relief.  Total relief.

K and Mary showed up shortly after and we were all reunited.  Other than being really thirsty Riley acted totally normal.  She lay down of course because, well, she had been running pretty much non-stop for four hours, but she was fine.  Totally fine.

As I said, relief.  Your mind tries not to go to all the scary dark places it could during these times… but they are there, inside of you, haunting you throughout.  It’s a huge amount of stress.

We made sure Riley was fine, that the gate was locked, that she had sufficient cuddles, and we then took off, back to Ebertfest.  We’d been willing to miss the rest of it if we’d had to if we didn’t find her, but since we did, we didn’t want to miss any more than we had.  We had that luxury.  Life was back to normal.  We were lucky.  Riley was lucky.

Life throws things at you like a missing dog, a missed film at Ebertfest because of it, the anxiety of it all followed by the elation.  In a nutshell, it’s a rollercoaster.

I appreciate life so much, not just because of this incident, but I would include this incident as a factor.  You never know what’s going to happen so hug your people, tell them you love them, hug your pets, tell them you love them, look at the sky and the trees and feel the wind in your face.  There’s beauty and love and light everywhere.

Riley came home.  And we’ll just get Pleasantville, the movie we missed at Ebertfest, from the library.

52 Thoughts – Tenth Thought

 

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Mind, body, spirit.  We’ve been trying to take care of the body part of that equation for a bit now.  Joined a new gym a month or so ago.  We’ve been going very regularly since save for the time we were in San Jose and then we at least tried to walk every day.  Moving the body has been great for the two other parts of that equation, mind, and spirit.  It makes me feel good about me to take care of myself.  Puts me in a good mental place.

 

That is all.

Our Boy is 10

Today is our boy, Weston’s, 10th birthday.  I can’t even begin to express what he means and has meant to our lives.  He is cantankerous, mischievous, smart, fun, quirky, and very loving.  He is our little Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde.  He can be very affectionate one minute and try to gnash at you the next if you look like you might want to take something from him.  Never try and take something from him.  He loves to play catch with a ball and can actually nose that ball back to you over and over so you are literally playing catch with him.  It’s crazy and cool.  We really should take a video of it.  He loves going on walks, letting us know in the afternoon if he hasn’t had one yet that day by giving us the half bark.  He loves bully sticks and cheese.  He loves cuddle time in the morning, wanting to be spooned with his head on my pillow, and cuddle time at night when we watch TV, laying on me with his head on my chest.  He barks to get veggies when we are cutting them up for dinner and whines to get just a little bit of oatmeal in the morning.  It’s not his fault, we give him veggies and oatmeal.  We spoil him.  We should.

Our philosophy about our pups has always been that we chose them, and because we chose them we owe them.  We owe them a good life, love, fun, walks, and our attention.  They are pure creatures.  Innocent.  Dependent on us in so many ways.  And because of this, we have an obligation to them.  Every day.  To take care of them the best way we can, to love them like they deserve to be loved, and to accept their little foibles and faults, because yes, they have them.

Weston is our little man.  Our grumpy, moody, affectionate little dude.  He is light and love and sometimes frustration, but he is ours, and we are his.  I love him more than I can say and am grateful every day for his little furry presence in my life.

Happy birthday little man.  We love you.

52 Thoughts – Ninth Thought

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Photo by TJ Parker

Be kind in big ways and small even when it seems a tad difficult.  Be present.  Listen more, talk less. Close my eyes, turn my face to the sun or the wind or both at the same time and breathe deeply.  Spend time on or near the water.  Go on long walks with the pups. Drink life in.  Be silly and dorky and unafraid to make a fool of myself.  We are bombarded with information every day so choose wisely.  Life is a matter of perception so remember I can see things in a negative or positive light. Act to change things in ways I feel I can.  Meet the world with love and good intentions in my heart instead of fear and anger.  Smile at people I know and don’t know.  Bridge gaps.  Notice a glint of sun.  Appreciate the natural world.  Think about what it might be like for others.  Cuddle the pups often.  Laugh and play with the grandkids. Write letters. Tell people I love them.  Be honest even when it’s uncomfortable.  Share. Recognize joy. Believe in hope. Dance. Cry. Be curious. Give lots of hugs. Accept compliments. Hold my honey’s hand every chance I can.

52 Thoughts: Eighth Thought

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Photo by TJ Parker

Forgiveness.

I walk down the hallway at night
House asleep
Creaks and wind and chimes filter in
I’m at my in-laws house
There’s sickness here
And a kind of hope for better
… feeling better and being better
They love me
I feel that
It’s mutual
I write poems at night when I can’t sleep
I don’t remember them in the morning
After sleep finally comes and washes them away
I think that night work is my best work
Just saying
But it gets me through the hours
Filled with creaks and wind and stray whining cats outside
There’s something special to this forgetting
As if mysteries were revealed to me
Then taken away again
I know they are there
Just out of reach
But there nonetheless
Magic
It’s because of this I forgive myself
Forgiveness for the forgetting
I walk down the hallway at night

~ TJ Parker

52 Thoughts: Fifth Thought

 

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Photo by TJ Parker

I’ve been thinking.

Today the sky is blue.  It’s cold, but beautiful.  The birds are at the feeders.  The squirrels are trying to get to the feeders.  The dogs are chasing the squirrels.  They picked up our garbage and recycling today as per usual.  I’m listening to music.  We’re about to head to the gym to do some circuit training, then we’ll go grocery shopping.  Tonight we’ll make dinner.  At some point this afternoon we’ll try to take the dogs for a walk after we put the girlie’s sweater on, she gets cold.  We’ll eat dinner and watch some TV or a movie, maybe one we will be picking up at the library as we do our errands today.  My honey will work.  I’ll do laundry, empty the dishwasher, clean up the media room.  We will pet the dogs and cuddle them.  We will talk and laugh and smile at each other.

I’ve been thinking.

It’s a great life.  We have a great life.  It’s nice to remember that.

52 Thoughts: Third Thought

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Photo by TJ Parker

Lately I’ve been struck by how much our culture has sadly moved to a do as I say not as I do philosophy.  If you want to relate it to politics, it’s both sides saying about the other that this or that has been said and it’s terrible, unconscionable, awful, then they turn around and say something equally as terrible, unconscionable, and awful and somehow that’s OK.  It’s as if people think they can say, post, write, whatever they want about a person or a thing, but others who might have an opposing opinion have no right or are somehow unamerican if they believe differently, talk about things differently.

One of the things I love about this country is the tapestry.  We are different.  We think differently about things, our lives, our problems, the solutions to our problems.  And just because I may disagree with you, or you with me, doesn’t make either one of us wrong. We just see things differently based on our personal experience.  This is where empathy comes in.  Or at least it should.

We get so caught up in our own stuff.  Our problems, our routines, the daily minutia of our lives.  Of course we do.  What’s happening for us on a daily basis can be all consuming if we are experiencing something tough in the moment.  It can be all consuming just going through a regular day.  Laundry and bills and work and dishes and cleaning the house and taking care of the kids and the kid’s schedules and our schedules and health issues and taking care of our pets and on and on.  It’s easy to be buried under it.  We have blinders on and get caught up in it all so that when we are speaking about something, looking at something and rendering an opinion about it, we tend to do it from our perspective alone. We forget that everyone else is going through the same thing, getting through it in their own way.  That’s millions of people and millions of perspectives.  Each based on their own philosophy earned from living their life.

So, what does all this rambling mean?  What am I trying to get at here?

We need to somehow remember that our opinions aren’t the only opinions.  That the views of other people mean something.  If nothing else they mean something to them. Honest criticism is good.  Honest criticism is necessary.  No one individual opinion matters more than another.  If you don’t like how I’m doing something, especially if it relates to you, or someone you care about, or a subject that matters to you, you have a right to speak your opinion about it.  I would hope you do it respectfully.  I would hope you would be genuine and sincere.  But I would hope you would say something.

Disagreement is good.  Calling someone out for doing something hurtful to others is good. Having a difference of opinion about how to run the government or raise your children or enhance education or clean up the environment is good.  It sparks conversation.  During conversation ideas are exchanged.  When we exchange ideas we come up with more creative solutions, we go at problems from more than one direction.  Things actually get done.

First though, we have to get over this silly notion of doing as I say not as I do.  Let’s instead do what we say.  Let’s expect that if we are critical, others might be critical of us in return. This does not make us unamerican.  On the contrary, it’s what makes us an American.